DMS 1568

DMS 1568 is a BOEING specification for 5Al-2.5Sn calling for “TITANIUM ALLOY SHEET, STRIP AND PLATE, 5AL-2.5SN, ANNEALED”

 

DMS specifications originate from Boeing’s Long Beach facility under D1-4426 Approved Process Lists. DMS1568 / DMS 1568 originated at the Long Beach facility, therefore it is widely used for Boeing’s aircraft manufacturing at multiple locations.

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

 

Why does your project callout specification

DMS 1568?

 

As a Tier 1 Aerospace company, Boeing holds its subcontractors to the same standards by ensuring they source Titanium per DMS 1568 from approved sources. This creates accountability and ensures the highest quality standards are achieved in the manufacturing process. An excerpt from Boeing’s quality website states the following:

Our commitment to steady, long-term improvement in our products and processes is the cornerstone of our business strategy. Maintaining customer satisfaction and enhancing shareholder value are mutual goals of both Boeing and its suppliers. To achieve these objectives, we must continuously work together to improve the overall efficiency and productivity of our design, manufacturing, administrative and support organizations.

History of Boeing Long Beach

 

What does the history of Boeing have to do with the DMS Specifications? It provides a road map for why Boeing still uses these specifications even though the company is widely known for its BAC and BMS Specifications.

Founded in 1921, Donald Wills Douglas Sr. founded Douglas Aircraft which is known for its innovation and producing the Douglas DC-3. The Douglas DC-3 is regarded as “the most significant transport aircraft ever made” because of its ability to change the commercial airline industry forever. The DC-3 had many exceptional qualities compared to previous aircraft. It was fast, had a good range, was more reliable, and carried passengers in greater comfort. Before the war, it pioneered many air travel routes. It was able to cross the continental US from New York to Los Angeles in 18 hours and with only 3 stops. It is one of the first airliners that could profitably carry only passengers without relying on mail subsidies.

Merger with McDonnell Aircraft Company

 

In 1967, Douglas Aircraft merged with McDonnell Aircraft to form McDonnell Douglas which sparked the beginning of extensive growth in the newly formed company. This merger coupled with the tensions increasing during the Cold War, McDonnell Douglas introduced and brought to production some of the most iconic military/defense aircraft

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

While the DC-10 was built for the Commercial Aerospace market, the KC-10 variation was used for air-to-air refueling. DMS1568 has applications for both Commercial and Defense Aerospace.

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

McDonnell Douglas is also known for its F-18 (left) and F-15 (right) aircraft.

On January 13, 1988, McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics won the US Navy Advanced Tactical Aircraft (ATA) contract. The US$4.83 billion contract was to develop the A-12 Avenger II, a stealth, carrier-based, long-range flying wing attack aircraft that would replace the A-6 Intruder.

 

Total Quality Management System (TQMS)

 

In January 1989, Robert Hood, Jr was appointed President to lead the Douglas Aircraft Division, replacing retiring President Jim Worsham. McDonnell Douglas then introduced a major reorganization called the Total Quality Management System (TQMS).

TQMS ended the functional setup where engineers with specific expertise in aerodynamics, structural mechanics, materials, and other technical areas worked on several different aircraft. This was replaced by a product-oriented system where they focus on one specific airplane. As part of reorganization, 5,000 managerial and supervisory positions were eliminated at Douglas. The former managers could apply for 2,800 newly created posts; the remaining 2,200 would lose their managerial responsibilities. The reorganization reportedly led to widespread loss of morale at the company and TQMS was nicknamed “Time to Quit and Move to Seattle” by employees referring to the competitor Boeing headquartered in Seattle, Washington.

1990’s

 

Technical issues, development cost overruns, growing unit costs, and delays led to the termination of the A-12 Avenger II program on January 13, 1991, by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. Years of litigation would proceed over the contract’s termination: the government claimed that the contractors had defaulted on the contract and were not entitled to the final progress payments, while McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics believed that the contract was terminated out of convenience, and thus the money was owed. The chaos and financial stress created by the collapse of the A-12 program led to the layoff of 5,600 employees

In 1991, MD-11 was not quite a success; ongoing tests of the MD-11 revealed a significant shortfall in the aircraft’s performance. An important prospective carrier, Singapore Airlines, required a fully laden aircraft that could fly from Singapore to Paris, against strong headwinds during mid-winter; the MD-11 did not have sufficient range for this at the time. Due to the less-than-expected performance figures, Singapore Airlines cancelled its 20-aircraft MD-11 order on August 2, 1991, and ordered 20 A340-300s instead.

Merger with Boeing and Legacy of McDonnell Douglas

 

McDonnell Douglas merged with Boeing in August 1997 in a US$13 billion stock swap, with Boeing as the surviving company. Boeing adopted the modified version of the McDonnell Douglas logo, which showed the globe being encircled in tribute to the first aerial circumnavigation of Earth, which was accomplished in 1924 by Douglas aircraft. Boeing not only adopted the logo, but also adopted some of McDonnell Douglas’ manufacturing processes including the specifications under DMS which is why manufacturers today still see those older specs.

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

DMS 1568, DMS 1568, FIGHTER JET METALS

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